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La atención pastoral de los niños

La atención pastoral de los niños

Para José de Calasanz, la atención pastoral de los maestros-sacerdotes a los niños, aunque ciertamente diferente a la de hoy, era una tarea indispensable. A los niños no se les permitió volver a la calle. La escuela y la catequesis los domingos era obligatoria todo el año. Todos los Escolapios fueron asignados de tal manera que sin interrupción pudieran estar con los niños. Sólo entonces se podía pensar en las vacaciones. El escolapio era, pues, profesor en la escuela y pastor fuera de ella. Esto sigue siendo nuestra misión y tarea hoy en día.

Para la transmisión de la fe a los niños, los padres, la escuela (y la parroquia) deben trabajar juntos, si se quiere dar un ejemplo de fe cristiana y hacerles experimentar la Iglesia de forma concreta.

Cada vez hay más padres que no educan a sus hijos religiosamente. Han dejado la instrucción religiosa a la «iglesia» (nosotros, profesores de religión; catequistas,…). Cada vez hay mas padres que son puramente materialistas, que crían a sus hijos sólo con mentalidad materialista. Esto significa indiferencia religiosa e incapacidad para un humanismo constructivo y falta de fe viva (pensemos en lo que se pierde ahí).

Jesús eligió a sus discípulos para enviarlos al mundo. Pero primero tenía que instruirlos, enseñarles. Dos discípulos de Juan el Bautista siguieron a Jesús. Le preguntaron. Maestro, ¿dónde vives? Jesús les dijo: venid y veréis. Entonces vinieron con él y vieron dónde vivía, y se quedaron con Él aquel día (Juan 1:35-51). Permanecer con Jesús es un requisito indispensable para el anuncio de la palabra. Estar con Jesús significa, en primer lugar, escucharle, aprender de él, entusiasmarse con Jesús.

Por lo tanto: aún más importante que decir algo (hablar) sobre Dios, (Jesús), es escuchar a Dios y hablar con Él. Rezar en el Padrenuestro: “Santificado sea tu nombre” es pedir a Dios que santifique su nombre mostrándose como Dios salvador, liberador, amoroso y perdonador en mi vida (en la vida de los demás, en la historia).

De esto se deduce que la primera tarea en la predicación, en el ministerio pastoral, es la ORACIÓN: en silencio, escuchando lo que Dios nos dice y desea: “habla, Señor, tu siervo escucha” (1 Sam 3,1-10).

Aquí no hay lugar para medias verdades teológicas ni para experimentos de fe. Todos somos mensajeros de Dios y no podemos proclamar lo que queremos.

P. Pius Platz Sch. P.

PIUS PLATZ CAROL

PIUS PLATZ CAROL

Escolapio

Sacerdote escolapio. Nacido en Barcelona en el año 1935. Inició su vida religiosa en 1959 en la ciudad de Viena, Austria. Estudió la filosofía en la Universidad de Viena y la teología en la Universidad Gregoriana de Roma. Se ha desempeñado como maestro de religión, vicario parroquial, párroco, rector tanto en la iglesia de María Treu como en la de Santa Tecla. Ha creado cursillos de meditación para niños, para padres de familia, preparación para los sacramentos, entre otros.

The heart is the most value

The heart is the most value

All of us have areas that we are struggling with. However, God does not evaluate his children basing on its mistakes, but the hearts do: The heart is always highlighted by the Lord, as it said in Mk 7:6, “These people honor me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me.” God is always looking for those who live with Him from the heart; 2 Chronicles 16:9 said, “The eyes of the Lord range throughout the earth to strengthen those whose hearts are fully committed to him.” We knew and were convinced that God is not only looking for the perfect ones, well performance, good manners, and behaviors, people, who were never making mistakes, but he also looking to the people who have the perfect heart toward Him.

Hezekiah was announced by Isaiah that ‘you are about to die’ ‘Hezekiah turned his face to the wall and prayed to the Lord.’ Two concrete action verbs that ‘turn’ and ‘pray.’ It doesn’t matter how sinful we are, how many mistakes we had committed, but after all, did we turn, pray, and look for the mercy of God? Hezekiah’s prayer at the last moment he said, “Remember, Lord, how I have walked before you faithfully and with wholehearted devotion and have done what is good in your eyes.” (2nd Kings 20:3) Scripture described that moment he wept bitterly, not simply weeping but wept bitterly. I noticed that; in Hezekiah’s prayer, he didn’t mention any negative things or what are his wrongdoings were against God, but he said what pleasing to Him (God). It is showing us, the mercy of God is greater than all other things in the eyes of God, and God’s looking at his children is much greater mercy; the mercy of God greater than the law. I am convinced that the way God looks at us, what the people cannot see is the heart.

The wrong things that we did cannot say who we are; the only One can say that who we are is the Most High God; the fact that we cannot change our dignity “the Children of God” Whenever we are here on earth, we are in the process of changing:

The key for us here is to accept we are in the process of changing and turning the heart to Him.“I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove from you your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh.” Ezekiel (36:26). If we do so, I do believe that God is also telling us what he said to Hezekiah “I have heard you; I will heal you; I will rescue you; I will be your shield…”

Br. Van Luc Tran Sch. P.

VAN LUC TRAN

VAN LUC TRAN

Piarist

Br. Tran Van Luc Sch. P. hails from the Archdiocese of Hanoi, Viet Nam. He is a Marketing graduate, joined the Piarist Fathers in 2014. He took Philosophy units at the Adamson University and Certificate for Practical Social Skills Class at HCMC Youth Employment Service and Vocational Training Center. He is the writer of several books, like, “Hanh Phuc & Khon Ngoan; Tien Van Tam-Nha Giao Duc…” Currently, he is taking Master of Arts in Theological Studies (MATS) – Maryhill School of Theology.

A Pastoral Letter from the Piarist Bishop of the Archdiocese of Manila

A Pastoral Letter from the Piarist Bishop of the Archdiocese of Manila

In the book, The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, Volume 50, one can find the copy of the English translation of the Pastoral Letter of Archbishop Basilio Sancho of Manila, dated October 25, 1771. This letter instructs the Archdiocese secular priests about retirement and abstraction from the world, behavior, schools, catechism, social and parish activities.

In his letter, he reminded his priests to observe their behavior outside their parishes by not entering any house except for administering the sacraments or facilitating some functions that have something to do with souls’ care. He added that they should also pay all respect and courtesy to the officials of the villages and justices. Also, the governing persons cannot remove their caps in the priests’ presence and serve them during the meal.

Furthermore, he also made some precautions to his priests by instructing them to prohibit women from entering the convent; by observing the church rubrics; forbidding game of cards; not leaving their respective villages except for hearing confessions; wearing priestly robes, and the punishment for any priests who are not appropriately dressed; and spending time in prayer and studies.

As a Piarist, he also ordered his clergymen to visit the schools for boys and, if possible, the schools for girls. He likewise stated that priests should not meddle with election matters but instead win the people’s affection and reverence by attending to their spiritual needs and giving counsels.

In line with the parishioners’ catechism and formation, he directed his priests to explain the doctrine and the gospel in the Castilian language and instruct the people with words and actions until the Christian message sinks into them, creating love and obedience to the church.

Lastly, Bishop Sancho ordered his priests to promote peace among their parishioners and to stop them from being idle by cultivating the land. Moreover, he encouraged them to halt cockfighting and liquor drinking in their villages and disallow young women or any woman to clean the church. Any priest who shall not observe the adornment and cleanliness of his church shall be punished. They were also mandated to remove the abuses concerning furnishing crosses and candlesticks of wood for the poor and silver for those who pay the fees. Finally, each priest shall prepare a book in which these decrees shall be written.

Synoptic

This article is a summary of Bishop Basilio Sancho’s Pastoral Letter from Historia de PP. Dominicos (Madrid, 1871 ), trans. By Blair & Robertson, The Philippine Islands, Volume 50, p. 265.

John Michael O. Dion Sch. P.

Br. JOHN MICHAEL O. DION

Br. JOHN MICHAEL O. DION

Piarist

John Michael hails from the Diocese of Tarlac, Philippines. He is a Psychology graduate, joined the Piarist Fathers in 2012. He took Philosophy units at the Rogationist Seminary and Certificate for Professional Education at the University of San Carlos in Cebu City. In 2020, he finished his Bachelor in Sacred Theology and Master of Arts in Pastoral ministry, specialized in Spirituality and Retreat Direction at the Loyola School of Theology – Ateneo de Manila University, Philippines. Currently, he is assigned at Calasanz de Davao Community, working as a subject teacher for Philippine history, World Religions, Applied Social Sciences, and Religious Studies at Calasanz de Davao Academy, Inc.

Retos misioneros de nuestra vida comunitaria

Retos misioneros de nuestra vida comunitaria

La dimensión comunitaria de la vida no experimenta buenos tiempos al menos desde las últimas dos décadas, víctima de un creciente individualismo proveniente de modelos económicos/organizativos y también de algunas escuelas psicológicas. Es el caso del concepto de resiliencia, original de la ingeniería y generalizado por la llamada psicología positiva a partir de los 80´s y 90´s como la capacidad personal de asumir con flexibilidad situaciones adversas y sobreponerse a ellas. Una apuesta por recuperar una “vida sana” en una sociedad básicamente “enferma”.

Reconozco haber trabajado la resiliencia en la misión de varios años con jóvenes en riesgo social de la Ciudad Hogar Calasanz en Costa Rica. Sin embargo, actualmente su uso indiscriminado me parece contraproducente, pues debilita la gestión comunitaria y social de la conflictividad potenciando más el individualismo. Mi reciente experiencia mexicana fue de gran ayuda para reconocer la importancia de las redes familiares y comunitarias (fuertes en el sustrato cultural mexicano), así como la urgencia por protegerlas y estimularlas. Sobre todo, porque una parte esencial del drama humano de nuestro tiempo proviene de una soledad individualista que lleva a la persona a ser su propio límite, pero también su propio juez, pudiendo sentirse fracasada por no alcanzar los resultados según el proyecto social que se identifica con realización y felicidad, potenciando un mundo falso y cruel de “ganadores” y “perdedores”. Se trata de una realidad donde los controles sociales tradicionales no son necesarios, pues son sustituidos por el autocontrol y la autoexplotación de personas aparentemente libres. La relación de esto, por ejemplo, con la depresión o el enojo y frustración expresados en las redes sociales, resulta más que evidente.

Es aquí donde los escolapios tenemos la oportunidad de transmitir nuestra experiencia comunitaria. Para esto me apoyo en las Constituciones. El n° 25, que nos invita a ser “ministros de la esperanza del Reino futuro y de la unión fraterna entre los hombres”; y el n° 38 (Cf. Gaudium et spes n° 1) al afirmar que: “nuestra comunidad, miembro de toda la familia humana y siempre dispuesta a servir, hace suyos, con gusto y decisión, los gozos y esperanzas, las tristezas y afanes de todos los hombres, particularmente en la comunidad local en que vivimos.” Encuentro en estas claves comunitarias muchas luces para la misión:

  1. Dando cabida y experiencia real a un “Dios que no hace distinciones, acepta al que le teme y practica la justicia, sea de la nación que sea” (Hch 10, 34)
  2. Favoreciendo el trabajo colaborativo (más allá de lo funcional) para potenciar la convivencia entre diferentes, su empatía y superior comunión evangélica
  3. Superando el debate teórico de la inculturación, al abrazar con amor cristiano y análisis respetuoso los anhelos de transformación social de familias y comunidades en los lugares donde vivimos y trabajamos
  4. Favoreciendo procesos y redes de acompañamiento de aquellos que sufren condiciones de precariedad, explotación y angustia.

En este durísimo contexto que vivimos, donde cada vez más personas sienten que no logran por sus propias fuerzas mantener una actitud positiva frente a las adversidades, abrigando la sensación de no ser felices y, por si fuera poco, sintiéndose culpables, los escolapios tenemos mucho que decir, mostrando al Dios de Jesucristo que busca, ama, reconcilia y salva. Nuestra vida comunitaria puede ser un gran signo y camino para ello.

P. Rodolfo Robert Sch. P.

RODOLFO ROBERT ESQUIVEL

RODOLFO ROBERT ESQUIVEL

Escolapio

Nacido en San José, Costa Rica (1961) es Religioso Escolapio de la Provincia Centroamérica-Caribe. Se ha desempeñado en la Escuela Pía como educador, formador, Superior Mayor y Delegado General para el Ministerio. Actualmente sirve a la misión en La Romana, República Dominicana.

Dio cuanto podía dar y encontró la vida eterna

Dio cuanto podía dar y encontró la vida eterna

Quien se da a sí mismo ha dado cuanto podía dar”. (San José de Calasanz)

San José de Calasanz encontró su vocación definitiva, aquella con la que se desarrolla lo mejor de sí mismo, en la ancianidad de la vida de entonces. A los 60 años hacía su profesión religiosa como el primer escolapio de la historia de la Iglesia. Antes de vivir ese momento, intentó buscar alternativas, intermediarios, llamó a muchas puertas, dio parte de su tiempo, de su hacienda, de su misma vocación sacerdotal, hasta que entendió por la lectura que hizo de su historia pasada, y descubrió en la educación de los niños pobres que Dios le pedía la vida, sin reservarse nada, debía dar un salto al vacío y dejarse guiar en esa nueva realidad, inédita en la Iglesia hasta ese momento, que fueron las Escuelas Pías, la primera Orden religiosa cuyo carisma fue la educación popular como medio de santificación (hoy diríamos de evangelización). Ese 25 de marzo de 1617 entregó todo lo que tenía y se consagró para siempre, dio cuanto podía dar, a sí mismo, sus proyectos, sus sueños, su tierra… y se le regalaron 30 años más de vida. Dio cuanto podía dar y encontró la vida eterna.

 

CARLES SUCH

CARLES SUCH

Religioso

Sacerdote escolapio entregado a la vida y acompañando la de niños y jóvenes para vivir con pasión. Perú es su lugar actual. España su cuna. El corazón humano su universo y Cristo, Calasanz y el evangelio su horizonte.

Is Jesus calling you to be an influencer? Is influencer the new “fishers of men”?

Is Jesus calling you to be an influencer? Is influencer the new “fishers of men”?

My short answer to these questions would be, I have my doubts. A slightly longer answer would be to ask my questioner to take a closer look at the text of Luke’s Gospel and see what Jesus did when he called these fishermen to be “fishers of men”.

Even before looking at the text, however, it is worth noticing that there have never been official “fishers of people” in the Church. Such a designation is and has been totally absent in the community. It never became a title or the name of a group of ministers. It did not survive the immediate period of the first transmission of the Gospel.

Why is that? It is difficult to tell. What we know for sure is that there are, already in the Gospel of Luke, important changes, modifications to earlier versions of the scene. It may well be that already the first Christians, Luke included, had the impression that the imagery of the expression is a bit strange, or even that it expresses something which, on second thoughts, is quite contrary to what is meant to be the mission of the followers of Jesus. For to catch fish amounts to taking them out of the medium where they can live. Whereas preaching the Good News as Jesus does is calling people into the Kingdom, helping them to reach life, transferring them into a lifegiving medium.

It is exactly this aspect which gets emphasis in the modified imagery conveyed by the verb Luke employs. Instead of speaking about “fishers”, as the other synoptics do, he uses the verb “zōgréō” (ζωγρέω). This verb is put together of two words: “zōos”, meaning “alive, living” and “agreúō”, which means “to capture”. Thus, the whole idea suggests something like “to catch alive” or “to catch to life”.

What is important for us to notice here is the fact that the original imagery of fishing people was changed as much as possible to introduce the idea of life, of bringing to life. At the same time, the other component, that is, the movement or the gesture of seizing, of grasping, which indicates external force and constraint, is relegated into the background.

It is equally important to notice that, with this modification, Luke is, in fact, following the direction of the movement that the original imagery implied. Let me explain.

Jesus is calling the disciples to leave behind the activity they got used to and from which they made their living. In short, he calls them to leave behind their identity. And he is doing it in a gentle way, coming as close to them as possible, using an imagery they can immediately understand. Jesus opens for them a new horizon. While in their previous activity it was their own life which was put at the focus, now Jesus invites them to another kind of activity, not focussed on themselves, on their own life, but on others. Jesus invites them to a new “job”, a new identity. That is the thrust of the original image that Jesus uses. He speaks about “people”: it is “human beings” (ἀνθρώπους) that they are invited “to be fishers” of.

Simply, but ingeniously, Luke resumes this movement, the direction implied in the metaphor of “fishers of people”. His innovation – that is, adding that bizarre verb, “zōgréō”, or “catch to life”, that we have already analysed – successfully maintains the metaphorical force of the original imagery and takes away as much as possible of the residue of any implications of an external or violent activity.

It is hard not to see in the effect of this double metaphorical novelty the real message. As our attention is driven away from an activity which is inherently external and aggressive, dealing with objects (“fishing”), we come to discover people in need of life. This is what Jesus is calling the disciples to do. And this is what the Gospel story calls us to do.

Jesus calls us to leave behind any activities and any methods that are appropriate for objects because they serve us and our needs. Activities that follow the logic of production and whose success is expressed in numbers and statistics. Ultimately, Jesus calls us to leave behind any identity – and any activity flowing from such an identity – that is closed because concerned about gaining power over others to establish itself.

Is being an influencer about giving life? Is being an influencer congruent with not using methods that degrade people into objects, methods that are ultimately violent? Is being an influencer not about reaching goals that have to do with gaining power? Is being an influencer about truly wishing that the other grow in freedom? Whatever the answer to these questions, one thing is clear.

We are called to discover people in need of life. And we are called to discover this activity as a new vocation: an activity that gives us a new identity, an activity that gives life to us as well.

You can be a life-giver. Be one. Discover people in need of life.

József Urbán

József Urbán

Piarist

A Hungarian Piarist, he is a teacher of English and Religion. For two terms, he was provincial of the Province in Hungary. At present, he is general assistant of the Order, responsible for Asia and is vice-provincial of the Vice-Province of India.