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La acedia y la indefensión aprendida

La acedia y la indefensión aprendida

Existen males internos que aquejan al ser humano de forma tan terrible o peor que las enfermedades de percepción física inmediata. Entre las más horrendas está la depresión, pero también están la melancolía, tristeza, aburrimiento, nostalgia, cabanga…

La tradición cristiana acuñó un vocablo para una situación similar, pero en el espíritu. Su nombre es acedia, y en los tiempos hodiernos ha empezado despertar gran interés pues describe lo que muchos viven.

La acedia es extremadamente difícil de entender, pero a grandes rasgos se puede decir que es la pérdida total del deseo, da igual una cosa que la otra, no hay interés, es un anhelo ahogado de ser aunque sea nada, menos aquello que se está sintiendo; es depresión del espíritu, somnolencia del alma, pérdida de fuerzas; da lo mismo vivir que morir, pero no se es capaz de optar por ninguna de las dos, porque no desea ninguna.

Ahora bien, dentro de las posibles causas de este estado, hay una de particular interés. Se llama indefensión aprendida, un término psicológico que describe una situación en la cual una persona nota que sus buenas acciones no obtienen retribución y sus malas tampoco tienen consecuencias negativas, o se dan invariablemente buenos resultados al hacer algo malo y malos al hacer algo bueno.

Cuando esta tendencia se mantiene por cierto tiempo, la persona pierde interés por actuar, porque piensa que no es posible cambiar su futuro con sus acciones, da igual lo que haga, el resultado nunca va a ser el esperado. Parece que siempre los frutos de sus esfuerzos no dependen en absoluto de ella. Se va el interés por actuar y por desear, porque al final nada de eso se concreta en la vida.

Sin embargo, hay dos atisbos de solución. Primero, hacer pequeñas cosas que fortalezcan la conciencia de que se puede controlar algo y se obtiene lo esperado. Segundo, cambiar la visión de Dios.

La frase: “aceptar la voluntad de Dios” no significa resistir pasivamente lo que suceda porque “dios lo manda”, sino que la voluntad de Dios es que nos descubramos loca y definitivamente amados por Él, que le amemos y amemos a los demás. La voluntad de Dios, su querer, es que nos concibamos sus hijos. Vencer la acedia puede empezar por entender que soy amado, que mis deseos sí interesan y son plausibles y que las dificultades no las tengo que soportar pasivamente.

Luis Demetrio Castillo Padilla Sch. P.

LUIS DEMETRIO CASTILLO PADILLA

LUIS DEMETRIO CASTILLO PADILLA

Escolapio

Nacido en San José, Costa Rica. Es estudiante de teología y realiza su misión en la capital de esta nación centroamericana.

The Effects of Covid 19 on the mental health of children and youth

The Effects of Covid 19 on the mental health of children and youth

Our Piarist Schools during the academic year 2020 to 2021 were not spared from the challenges caused by the pandemic. Stressors such as worry, stress, and grief that cause various mental health problems were also experienced by our students, teachers, and Piarist communities. Although many people are getting vaccinated nowadays, struggles and losses of the past year will continue to affect us especially the most vulnerable in our society, our children, and youth. Many of them have had tough times coping emotionally. Some of them try to hide their struggles because of fear and shame or they do not know how to talk about their experiences. So what are the causes of these stressors? How can we as Piarist educators identify signs of stress and mental health challenges among our students? What can we do to help our kids during this tough time?

According to Archana Basu, a research scientist and clinical psychologist from Harvard, worry or anxiety are the expected responses during the period of the pandemic. Disease aspects, economic stressors, and traumatic experiences can be experienced by children and youth, too. However, in the academic context, the biggest school-related stressors for our students is the remote learning mode. She explains that children generally learn well when actively engaged and in environments where they feel safe and socially connected. Moreover, remote learning requires a level of sustained attention and emotional regulation that is a very big demand, developmentally, for students in primary and middle school. In the Philippines alone, the burden was also extended to parents who became instant computer technicians and part-time teachers while doing their jobs. Because of the situation in physical safety, and social connectedness, our students’ mental health is being challenged.

According to the American Psychological Association, it is difficult for educators to indicate and identify if the students are experiencing mental health difficulties due to non-physical contact. However, educators can still communicate with the parents to identify students who may need extra support.
An online article from healthychildren.org listed several signs of stress and mental health challenges among students. It notifies the readers that mental health challenges are not the same for every child or teen, but there are some common symptoms. Infants, toddlers, and young children may experience backward progress in skills and developmental milestones. Problems like irritability, lack of sleep, separation anxiety, and many more may also increase. It is a different situation for older children and adolescents. They may show signs of distress with symptoms such as changes in mood, behavior, loss of interest in activities previously enjoyed, hard time falling or staying asleep, changes in appetite, less interest in schoolwork, and some cases death or suicide, or talking about it.

Besides communicating with the parents about this situation, as Piarist educators, it is also our mission to help our children and youth during this tough time. Basu listed several aid activities for parents and educators. In the classroom, whether in person or online, we as educators can help by focusing on socialization and fostering a sense of community among them in our social media apps. We can also take planned breaks from virtual classes like a quick walk or virtual games. Both parents and educators should invite their children to talk about how they are feeling during this difficult time. The APA suggested systematic screening of the school population through online questionnaires, nominating students who appear to be excessively anxious or frequently sad, and providing direct support to students who are potentially at risk for emotional issues.

The mental health of our students is very important for us Piarists. Our students with the healthy mental condition can meet their learning potential, cope with stress and be able to connect with their friends and community. Hence, it is also our mission to provide not only a learning environment but also mental health support especially during this time of the pandemic.

Sources:
www.apa.org
www.hsph.harvard.edu
www.healthychildren.org

John Michael O. Dion Sch. P.

 

Br. JOHN MICHAEL O. DION

Br. JOHN MICHAEL O. DION

Piarist

John Michael hails from the Diocese of Tarlac, Philippines. He is a Psychology graduate, joined the Piarist Fathers in 2012. He took Philosophy units at the Rogationist Seminary and Certificate for Professional Education at the University of San Carlos in Cebu City. In 2020, he finished his Bachelor in Sacred Theology and Master of Arts in Pastoral ministry, specialized in Spirituality and Retreat Direction at the Loyola School of Theology – Ateneo de Manila University, Philippines. Currently, he is assigned at Calasanz de Davao Community, working as a subject teacher for Philippine history, World Religions, Applied Social Sciences, and Religious Studies at Calasanz de Davao Academy, Inc.

Understanding Generation Z

Understanding Generation Z

Today, whenever we hear the word “young,” we always associate it with the Millennial Generation. Various documents were published about the so-called “Millennials.” Still, there is an emerging generation that we also need to know and understand; we call them “Generation Z.” Who are these members of the new generation? And why we need to understand them? 

“Gen Z’s” or the “Generation Z” are persons born into an environment where the internet, smartphones, and modern gadgets have already existed. They are named “screen-agers” because their whole experience is narrated by the culture, media, Netflix, and everything else.

Scholars describe them as persons born in a context where religion is no longer a significant influence. Due to the lack of Spiritual companions” and the absence of “peer or adult support.” They are skeptics toward religion and the moral necessity of believing in God.

Based on a study made by the Barna Research Group, this new generation is inclusive, less prejudiced, and driven to make a difference. Likewise, they are also open-minded and sensitive to other people’s feelings and opinions. Regarding identity, the research group found that members of Generation Z consider identity as something that a person feels inside rather than birth sex.

The Barna Group observed that the individuals from Generation Z admire their parents but at the same time do not feel the importance of family relationships in their lives. Their ultimate goal as individuals is to be happy. According to the study, the focus of Gen Z is primarily on professional success and financial security.

The Challenge for church pastors and leaders, especially for Piarists, is to understand this new generation. Today, most Catholic pastors and leaders are not well prepared to relate to and are also allergic to Generation Z occupies’ technological world. There is a great need to understand this new generation to help them in the Christian direction we aim to be. Pope Francis continually reminds us of the words “accompaniment” and “encounter.” And we can accomplish these two words by understanding the young generation. Our task is not only to understand them but also to evangelize to them that they are the future of the church and the present.

John Michael O. Dion Sch. P.

Synoptics

This article is a general view of who comprises Generation Z, their environment, behavior, belief, identity, models, and goals. 

Note:

The same author also published a more extended version of this article in their Student Publication: Tinig Loyola, A Student Publication of the Loyola School of Theology, Vol. 21, School year 2019-2020, p. 12.

Br. JOHN MICHAEL O. DION

Br. JOHN MICHAEL O. DION

Piarist

John Michael hails from the Diocese of Tarlac, Philippines. He is a Psychology graduate, joined the Piarist Fathers in 2012. He took Philosophy units at the Rogationist Seminary and Certificate for Professional Education at the University of San Carlos in Cebu City. In 2020, he finished his Bachelor in Sacred Theology and Master of Arts in Pastoral ministry, specialized in Spirituality and Retreat Direction at the Loyola School of Theology – Ateneo de Manila University, Philippines. Currently, he is assigned at Calasanz de Davao Community, working as a subject teacher for Philippine history, World Religions, Applied Social Sciences, and Religious Studies at Calasanz de Davao Academy, Inc.